Industry collaborates to bring augmented reality to Hawk aircraft

Source: BAE Systems

BAE Systems will collaborate with Red 6 to explore the integration of the Advanced Tactical Augmented Reality Systems (ATARS) onto the Hawk fast jet trainer aircraft. 

This will enable pilots to identify, engage and defeat virtual threats and co-operate with virtual wingmen whilst airborne.

BAE Systems has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with Red 6, an augmented reality technology firm at the forefront of synthetic air combat training. The collaboration will explore ways to combine BAE Systems’ experience in delivering training to military forces alongside its expertise in helmet-mounted displays with Red 6’s breakthrough ATARS technology.

“The modern battlespace is becoming increasingly complex and contested and integrating technology such as Red 6’s augmented reality with the Hawk aircraft is key as we prepare pilots for life in a fast jet cockpit for decades to come. We’re trusted by armed forces around the world to train over 450 pilots per year and it’s essential we have the right technologies and partnerships to ensure they stay ahead of the curve. We’re really excited to combine our unique insight from working alongside air forces across the globe with the truly game-changing capabilities of Red 6,” said Lucy Walton, BAE Systems Air Sector.

“Readiness and lethality are critical if our war fighters are to prevail against near peer adversaries. I’m thrilled that BAE Systems recognises the radical innovation that ATARS brings to drive the change in military flight training that is so desperately needed and that together can help drive this transformational shift,” commented Daniel Robinson, Founder and CEO of Red 6.

The companies announced they will be working together at I/ITSEC 2022, one of the world’s leading training and simulation shows, in Orlando, Florida.

BAE Systems has been a leader in the fast jet augmented reality market for over 60 years. The Company developed the world’s first heads up display (HUD) for the Buccaneer in 1958 and the family of Striker Helmet Mounted Display Systems (HMDS) used on Typhoon and Gripen aircraft.

Working with Red 6 takes this capability a step further for the pilots of tomorrow, by bringing constructed adversaries, wingmen and surface threats into the training space at a fraction of the cost and emissions of the live equivalent.

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